How-to-Tuesday: Making Mayonnaise

Making mayonnaise could not be easier if you use an immersion blender, also called a stick blender. These inexpensive kitchen appliances are so handy – perfect for making mayo, puréeing soups, and smoothing out that gravy that turned out a bit lumpy. And they’re very compact so they don’t take up much space in that drawer full of random things you’re not sure what to do with. Mayonnaise is so simple there’s really no reason not to make it at home. I’ve included a video to show just how easy it is! Best of all, you control the ingredients and can avoid the rancid industrial oils and factory-farmed eggs found in store-bought mayo. I got this recipe from my friend, Debra Meadow, a certified nutrition therapist at Blue Raven Wellness. I think using half expeller pressed coconut oil (the flavorless kind) and half extra virgin olive oil gives the best flavor and consistency. For my kids I substitute cold pressed sunflower oil for the EVOO, to give it a milder flavor.

Homemade mayo – easy and delicious!

Mayonnaise
Makes 2 cups

1 whole egg*
1 egg yolk
2t Dijon mustard (or ½t dry mustard)
½t salt
1T lemon juice
½c expeller pressed coconut oil
½c EVOO or cold pressed sunflower oil

About an hour beforehand, bring the eggs out of the fridge and let them come to room temperature. Measure out the coconut oil, melt it, and let it cool.

Wash the eggs with warm, soapy water. Crack one whole egg into a wide-mouth pint mason jar. Add the second yolk and all remaining ingredients. Place your immersion blender in the jar all the way to the bottom. Turn it on and slowly move it up and down until all the oil is emulsified. Put on lid and refrigerate.

 

 

*Concerned about eating raw eggs? The USDA determined in 2002 that only about 0.003% of eggs produced in the U.S. are contaminated with salmonella, and that was in a study of factory-farmed eggs, produced in the most dirty and unhealthy conditions imaginable. If you purchase pastured eggs your risk will be considerably lower.

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2 Responses

  1. October 13, 2015

    […] and found so many combinations of how to dress Celeri Remoulade– variations in mayonnaise (homemade, store bought), kinds and quantity of mustard, and use of fresh herbs like parsley — but why […]

  2. October 13, 2015

    […] and found so many combinations of how to dress Celeri Remoulade– variations in mayonnaise (homemade, store bought), kinds and quantity of mustard, sometimes a little cream or creme fraiche, and use […]

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